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03-animal-organs

Animal Organs, Human Recipients?

Genetic Modification Suggests Animal to Human Organ Transplants Might be Effective

BREAKTHROUGH eps: THE AGE OF AGING, MORE THAN HUMAN, FIGHTING PANDEMICS

Xenotransplantation is the stuff of science fiction: replacing human parts and organs with those of animals. Now, it could be just around the corner. Researchers at Revivicor, a company specializing in regenerative medicine, have genetically modified a pig’s heart… and used it to keep a baboon alive for nearly three years. The hope is similar genetic modification in pigs could make their organs safe for human implantation, preventing the deadly rejection complications that can arise from any organ transplant.

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02-rotten-eggs

The Stench of Rotten Eggs Just Got a Whole Lot Sweeter

A Common Compound, Hydrogen Sulfide is Found to be a Superconductor

BREAKTHROUGH eps: ENERGY ON THE EDGE

Superconductors for everyday use just took a step toward reality. At the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany, scientists have found that hydrogen sulfide – the compound responsible for the stench of rotten eggs – can conduct electricity with zero resistance. The catch? At a temperature of -70 C. However, this is the highest temperature ever for superconductivity, making it one step closer to a room temperature superconductor. And with that will come radically increased efficiency, which will change all grades of electronics for the better.

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01-dna

DNA Could Be the Answer to Future Digital Storage

A Fraction of an Ounce Could Store 300,000 Terrabytes of Data

BREAKTHROUGH eps: MORE THAN HUMAN

Paper degrades. Hard drives run down. But DNA lasts for thousands of years. What if our DNA held the answer to the future of digital storage? That theory has been recently presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society and the potential is astounding: a fraction of an ounce of DNA could store 300,000 terrabytes. Early durability tests have shown positive results, but research is still in its early stages.

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